Technology Integration Matrix

Goal Directed Learning | Adaptation Level | Language Arts

Please watch! Video of Technology Integration

Planning with inspiration…

The subject I selected is English from the Technology Integration Matrix website. The lesson I chose includes a video which shows fourth graders. I believe the lesson though would be great for any grade level. This lesson and the technology involved could help students learning a second language such as Spanish or students who are secondary English learners.It would be useful in drama classes or speech, and could be implemented into adult literacy programs. In the video a teacher uses a program called Audacity. This program records fluency and allows those recorded to look at the sound waves and see their voice inflection. The fourth grade class using the technology are reading a script and partaking as a group in a reader’s theater worksheet. An example of a reader’s theater style worksheet is Henry and Mudge and the Starry Night, a short story about a boy and his dog going on a family camping trip. A script of any sort could be used with the program Audacity, for higher level classes I’d recommend excerpts of classical literature or poetry.

The advantage of this technology is the ability it gives students to self evaluate themselves and their group partners. Also it can build their confidence in presenting and teach them to speak up and practice their pronunciation. As a teacher I would use this because I believe outside of giving them practice with reading I can let them hear the difference between their first attempt and the last and make them focus on their inner self and outside practice at home to reach goals. The technology would give me the ability to teach them to think intrinsically and self motivate themselves with literacy goals in mind. That way on future projects or future events in their lives they can hopefully look inside themselves and what they have done and can do to succeed and accomplish goals.

The lesson from the Technology Integration Matrix  was showing how to use technology in a goal directed, adaptive way. These two characteristics are very important to learning and the video shows how beneficial the program Audacity can be. The video provides evidence of just how important technology can be as a whole and the aid it gives to students. To fit the term goal directed, in the lesson you can see the obvious task the group of fourth graders are trying to accomplish, which is reading their script. Each group member has several goals: read their part, keep track of their part, pay attention to other group members parts, project their voice, and focus on any vocabulary or new words. After each recording they can check themselves and then eventually have a final version with them doing the best they can. To fit the term of adaptation, in the lesson you can see how the technology aids students and gives them the ability to modify their actions and goals based on their progress and hearing themselves. This technology also adapts and works with students according to the different multiple intelligence’s. Specifically, visual, intrapersonal, interpersonal, linguistic, and musical. Hitting these multiple intelligences is true evidence of a lesson being adaptive. Making something that adapts to every student is never an easy feat yet this fourth grade level lesson and the technology integrated in it prove that it can be done.

Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Domains

Each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is important to education. My content area would be Secondary English Education but with any subject this taxonomy is a good guideline for teaching lessons.

There are six levels in Bloom’s Taxonomy:

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These levels signify cognitive objectives. In the classroom specifically teaching high school English there are many ways this can be implemented.

  • The base is knowledge, in this area I’d give the students the fundamentals. For example if we were about to read an excerpt of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, I’d provide them with background on the author and the time period it was written and some of the social dynamics that influenced her to create Dr. Frankenstein and his monster.
  • The second level is comprehension, I would have the class read an excerpt from Frankenstein as a group and take notes on specific questions. Such as.. How does Victor react when his creation comes to life? Explain your feelings about his reaction to his creation. Were you surprised? Why or why not? Depending which excerpt the class reads questions may change.
  • The third level in Bloom’s Taxonomy is application. I would have students take the time to apply the large themes of the literature to current times. Some of the themes are the dangers of ruthless pursuit of knowledge, the natural world and it’s influences on experiences, and monstrosity.
  • Analysis is the fourth level and let students analyze a scene between the monster and his creator Dr. Frankenstein. Specifically for an example now, Chapter 10 were the monster pleads with Frankenstein for a chance to explain his feelings of his creation. They would compare and contrast the two characters in the form of a chart or small written essay using textual evidence.
  • Synthesis is where you put things together, in the classroom this would be a final overview of the content. I’d pass out a notes page for students to fill out before continuing on to evaluate them.
  • Lastly there is evaluation. In this area of teaching Frankenstein I would have students tested. The test or assignment would require them to recall information on the author and text. Including a comprehension constructed response question on how in today’s time the story of Frankenstein still parallels with the views on science and other constructs. I would ask them to pull a current issue where science and society collides.

HOW TO FORM QUESTIONS TO ENSURE HIGHER ORDER THINKING http://svesd.net/files/DOK_Question_Stems.pdf

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It can be used as a teacher or as a student. I would pair this with Bloom’s Taxonomy.

SOURCES:

http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html

http://teachnology.pbworks.com/f/Bloom%5C’s+Taxonomy+Blooms+Digitally.pdf

http://literature.org/authors/shelley-mary/frankenstein/