List of 35 Technology Resources

  1. Plickers 
  2. Storify 
  3. Prezi 
  4. Storybird 
  5. Flipsnack 
  6. FlipQuiz 
  7. SoundTrap 
  8. Trello 
  9. Slack 
  10. Pixlr
  11. Fotor 
  12. Animoto 
  13. Easelly 
  14. Class Dojo 
  15. MyHistro
  16. TED ed
  17. Word Cloud Generator
  18. Artsonia
  19. Inanimate Alice 
  20. Nearpod 
  21. Pear Deck 
  22. A Web Whiteboard 
  23. NASA’s Eyes 
  24. Desmos
  25. IM Creator
  26. Big Blue Button
  27. GIMP 
  28. Go Noodle 
  29. Google Classroom 
  30. TypeForm
  31. Socrative
  32. Booktrack Classroom
  33. Zaption 
  34. Piktochart
  35. Quizlet
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Framework for Technology in Class

Replacement, Amplification, and Transformation as it is described in the RAT Framework


The RAT Framework: Technology can be used in three ways

rat-004-001

A framework is a guide, and most often it’s an easy to remember guide or easy to follow guide. Frameworks consist of concepts, definitions and theories.

A framework should be…

  1. Clear
  2. Sound
  3. Rational
  4. Logical
  5. Accurate

     The RAT Framework is a guide to using technology in the classroom. A great example of an assignment that aligns with the acronym RAT is

R: Replacement, this would be instead of using a paperback dictionary/thesaurus in class and having students substitute it with a dictionary/thesaurus website or app such as Merriam-Webster. Great for English classes.

A: Amplification, this would be if students used a program such as Create a Graph to make multiple versions of a chart using data they found in class. Very useful in math and science courses.

T: Transformation, this would be using a technology such as virtual field trips, 3 Virtual Trips is a site which leads to interactive, first person experiences and simulations students may have never been able to see before. Some of the trips include Anne Frank, Ancient Egypt, and Ellis Island. Elsewhere on the internet you can take virtual tours of the Vatican and Lascaux Cave Paintings. Great for Social Studies and Art teachers to use.

Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Domains

Each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy is important to education. My content area would be Secondary English Education but with any subject this taxonomy is a good guideline for teaching lessons.

There are six levels in Bloom’s Taxonomy:

Image result for bloom's taxonomy

These levels signify cognitive objectives. In the classroom specifically teaching high school English there are many ways this can be implemented.

  • The base is knowledge, in this area I’d give the students the fundamentals. For example if we were about to read an excerpt of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, I’d provide them with background on the author and the time period it was written and some of the social dynamics that influenced her to create Dr. Frankenstein and his monster.
  • The second level is comprehension, I would have the class read an excerpt from Frankenstein as a group and take notes on specific questions. Such as.. How does Victor react when his creation comes to life? Explain your feelings about his reaction to his creation. Were you surprised? Why or why not? Depending which excerpt the class reads questions may change.
  • The third level in Bloom’s Taxonomy is application. I would have students take the time to apply the large themes of the literature to current times. Some of the themes are the dangers of ruthless pursuit of knowledge, the natural world and it’s influences on experiences, and monstrosity.
  • Analysis is the fourth level and let students analyze a scene between the monster and his creator Dr. Frankenstein. Specifically for an example now, Chapter 10 were the monster pleads with Frankenstein for a chance to explain his feelings of his creation. They would compare and contrast the two characters in the form of a chart or small written essay using textual evidence.
  • Synthesis is where you put things together, in the classroom this would be a final overview of the content. I’d pass out a notes page for students to fill out before continuing on to evaluate them.
  • Lastly there is evaluation. In this area of teaching Frankenstein I would have students tested. The test or assignment would require them to recall information on the author and text. Including a comprehension constructed response question on how in today’s time the story of Frankenstein still parallels with the views on science and other constructs. I would ask them to pull a current issue where science and society collides.

HOW TO FORM QUESTIONS TO ENSURE HIGHER ORDER THINKING http://svesd.net/files/DOK_Question_Stems.pdf

Image result for dok

It can be used as a teacher or as a student. I would pair this with Bloom’s Taxonomy.

SOURCES:

http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html

http://teachnology.pbworks.com/f/Bloom%5C’s+Taxonomy+Blooms+Digitally.pdf

http://literature.org/authors/shelley-mary/frankenstein/